Biology Seminar: Fall 2017

The Biology Seminars (biosem) happen every Thursday at noon, in RKC 103 (large auditorium). The list of speakers and talks this semester:

  • 9/7 INFORMATION SESSION
  • 9/14 Krishna Veeramah,  SUNY Stony Brook. Ancient European Dog Genomes Reveal Continuity Since the Early Neolithic
  • 9/21 Ilyas Washington, Columbia University.
  • 9/28 Wilfredo Colon, RPI. Degradation-resistant proteins: Biological, Disease, and Biotechnology Implications
  • 10/5 Helen Alexander, Kansas University. Effects of Viruses on Plant Fitness: A Plant Ecologist’s Foray into Plant Virus Ecology
  • 10/12 Dave Alexander, Kansas University. The Evolution of Animal Flight From a Biomechanics Perspective
  • 10/19 NO SEMINAR
  • 10/26 Pia-Kelsey O’Neill, Columbia University.
  • 11/2 Jessica Hua, SUNY Binghamton. Poisons, Predators, and Parasites: Integrating Ecological and Evolutionary Complexity into Toxicology
  • 11/9 Sarah Dunphy-Lelii, Bard College. The Chimpanzees of Ngogo
  • 11/16 Felicia Keesing, Bard College. Integrating Livestock and Wildlife in an African Savanna
  • 11/23 THANKSGIVING RECESS
  • 11/30 Felicia Keesing. How to Plan a Meaningful Summer
  • 12/7 Student talks
  • 12/14 Student talks

New paper: integrating wildlife and livestock in central Kenya

In this paper, Felicia Keesing and her collaborators explore the potential for positive interactions between livestock and wildlife in African savannas. Historically, the prevailing view has been that savanna landscapes should be managed for either livestock or wildlife, but not both. Keesing and her colleagues suggest that under some conditions, both groups — and the humans who share their habitat — could benefit ecologically and economically by sharing land.

Citation: Allan BF, Tallis H, Chaplin‐Kramer R, Huckett S, Kowal VA, Musengezi J, Okanga S, Ostfeld RS, Schieltz J, Warui CM, Wood SA, Keesing F. Can integrating wildlife and livestock enhance ecosystem services in central Kenya?. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 2017 Aug 1;15(6):328-35. Full text at Research Gate.

Student research: Daniella Azulai

In her senior project, Daniella Azulai ’17 studied antibiotic resistance of a bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a pathogen that plagues patients with compromised immune systems and people with cystic fibrosis. Daniella developed a new method to test how virulent (harmful) different strains of these bacteria are. Using larval zebrafish, she found that antibiotic resistance does not necessarily correlate with virulence, but rather that each strain showed a unique profile, pointing to differences in the evolution of these strains over time.